Differentiating regular sadness from depression

Differentiating regular sadness from depression

Every individual feels sad and, in fact, it is quite normal to feel sad at times. However, if sadness lasts for prolonged periods, it can be a concern as sadness is one of the symptoms of depression. But this does not mean a person who is sad has to necessarily be depressed. Many a times, sadness is misinterpreted as depression. Feeling sad and being depressed are two entirely different states of mental health. Continue reading

Dealing with psychotic disorders in teens

Dealing with psychotic disorders in teens

It has been observed that teens are developing psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia, in a higher number these days. According to a study conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the age of developing psychotic disorders or schizophrenia is around 17. Around 30 to 40 percent of prodromal symptoms among teens – those showing warning signs – may lead to schizophrenia or any other psychotic disorder. It further stated that about 25 percent of such teens continue to experience mild symptoms without getting worse, while around 35 percent get better with adulthood. Continue reading

There’s light at the end of the tunnel: Escaping the lows of major depressive disorder

There’s light at the end of the tunnel: Escaping the lows of major depressive disorder

It’s difficult to imagine how it feels to be suffering from major depressive disorder; most people think it’s perhaps a magnified sort of sadness. Cynthia Lubow, M.S., MFT, described the condition as follows: “Major depression feels like intense pain that can’t be identified in any particular part of the body. The most (normally) pleasant and comforting touch can feel painful to the point of tears. People seem far away, on the other side of a glass bubble. No one seems to understand or care and people seem insincere. Depression is utterly isolating.” Continue reading

Conquering depression: One man’s story of triumphing over mental illness

Conquering depression: One man’s story of triumphing over mental illness

Depression does not discriminate based on race, gender or occupation. Any individual can develop symptoms of depression, sometimes never overcoming the mental health condition. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America profiled “Marc,” a man who struggled immensely with depression. While Marc attempted to function in society, depression continuously made life difficult.

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A person can’t “snap out” of depression

A person can't "snap out" of depression

Depression is an all-encompassing disease that can happen to any person at any time. Contrary to popular belief, depression presents physical symptoms as well as emotional ones. It is not simply a temporary feeling of sadness, but a potentially long-term debilitating condition. People with depression lose interest in pursuits that formerly brought pleasure and may isolate themselves from friends and family members to avoid social interaction. Expecting a person to “snap out” of depression is comparable to asking a person on crutches to start walking again. Continue reading

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