Tips to navigate through the chilling winter months

Tips to navigate through the chilling winter months

Shorter days, longer nights, chilly winds and scanty sunlight can cause anyone to feel gloomy and disoriented. If this happens occasionally then it is normal and one can recover soon. However, if this happens like a pattern every year, then one might be suffering from seasonal affective disorder (SAD). SAD or seasonal depression is a form of mental illness, which occurs every year around the fall season, and the symptoms get worse during winters. The common symptoms are irritability, loss of interest in daily activities, increased need to stay in bed, craving for carbohydrates, sadness, isolation from the social circle, extreme fatigue and lack of energy. Continue reading

Dysthymia – A few coping strategies

Dysthymia – A few coping strategies

Dysthymia is a condition in which a person struggles with mild symptoms of depression for at least two years. Though it is not as critical as major depression, it affects nearly 1.5 percent of American adults. Dysthymia symptoms include loss of appetite or binge eating, insomnia or oversleeping, fatigue, feeling low and disoriented, lack of concentration and performance issues at workplace or school. The symptoms can last for several years without the condition being diagnosed. Continue reading

Depression is treatable despite the coexisting illness

Depression is treatable despite the coexisting illness

Depression is a common psychiatric disorder that is often seen in tandem with another medical illness or condition. It is not fully understood why depression leaves one susceptible to physical disorders or why a physical condition increases the risk of developing depression. However, the good news is that depression is treatable even when compounded by other illnesses. Continue reading

Self-reflect to understand and pacify a depressive mood

Self-reflect to understand and pacify a depressive mood

Happiness is a state of mind that depends solely on an individual. A great body of literature and scientific studies have said that when a person relies on another person or a situation for his/her happiness, then one is bound to feel a gamut of emotions every now and then. This is a sign of instability arising out of lack of self-assurance. This is the reason a lot of people feel sad and disoriented without any reason. When such a stage arrives, one needs to get into a self-actualization mode to understand what is going wrong. Continue reading

Interplay between physical and mental illness

Interplay between physical and mental illness

It is far too often that the mind and body are referred to as two separate entities, especially in the medical field. However, they share a closer relationship, exemplifying a two-way communication, where illnesses affecting the body can also affect the mind and vice versa. The interconnectedness is evident in the way serious ailments affect the physical health of a person and may make him/her more anxious or depressed after being diagnosed with the illness. The other possibility is that the symptoms of mental disorders mask the presence of a physical ailment. Sometimes, a mental illness can trigger the onset of a physical illness too. The question arises – how this impacts the treatment of either or both, the disorders? Continue reading

Depression triggers – Part 4: Low self-esteem and depression are intertwined

Depression triggers – Part 4: Low self-esteem and depression are intertwined

There are times when people start doubting their abilities, especially, after a brief brush with failure. However, when this low self-esteem becomes a norm in one’s life, it can lead to various mental health problems.

Self-esteem reflects a person’s faith in him or herself. Healthy self-esteem makes one feel positive about oneself and about life, which, in turn, empowers him or her to deal better with life’s crests and troughs. On the contrary, low self-esteem raises a person’s vulnerability to collapse in difficult times. Continue reading

Depression triggers – Part 3: Social media can cause depression

Depression triggers – Part 3: Social media can cause depression

It seems spending time on various social media platforms has become the favorite pastime of Americans, with people using them to connect, share information, entertain themselves or to stay updated.

According to the Pew Research Center, social media use in American adults has increased from a meager 5 percent in 2005 to a whopping 69 percent in 2011. The research also reported social media users to be using relatively different platforms – around 56 percent adults going online used more than one of the five social media platforms studied in this survey. Continue reading

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